Management

Generally having to do with chorus management

Artistic leadership of a chorus is both an individual balancing act and a highly collaborative endeavor.

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Managing Time So You Have More of It

If your day is spent managing a chorus, then you know all too well how Murphy’s Law and the ongoing needs of your staff and board can exacerbate the ability to get your own work done.

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All the accountability checks in the world won't prevent lousy decisions if board members, managers, and artistic leaders lack teamwork and communications chemistry. Cultivate a healthy culture that brings out the best group traits of your board.

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A practical guide for improving message strategy and branding.

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Raising money can pose tough ethical dilemmas. Luckily, guidance is available to help you discern right from wrong. 

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Are you frustrated by your board's effectiveness in raising dollars? Finding the right board leaders can yield rich dividends. We explore some of the best techniques for getting your board 'on board'.

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Developing a dynamic board requires identifying a pool of strong candidates, the ability to select the right ones for your organization, and an effective board orientation. It is also important to engage and educate your trustees, to have an effective board rotation plan, to ensure that your representation is diverse, and to evaluate performance so that your board improves with age. And of course, it is always important to show your appreciation to the trustees who give your arts organization its special personality.

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Choruses undergo many transitions in their life span—founder transitions, music director transitions, transitions from volunteer to paid staff. Perhaps the most delicate of these important transitions is the evolution from a singer board to a community board. This shift from a board comprised predominately of singers who have responsibility for every facet of the organization to a governing body with broad community representation can be both a challenging and lengthy process.

A chorus by its very nature is a collaboration - singers, instrumentalists, music directors, front-office staff—all, according to Webster, performing work or labor together, especially literary (read artistic) pursuits." So it comes as no surprise that choruses would extend that collaborative spirit beyond their own organizations.

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Few performing arts organizations need to be told they are unique. To start with, the leadership structure of performing arts groups is as distinctive from other nonprofits as performing arts groups are from each other. While most nonprofits divide leadership between the board and the chief executive, performing arts organizations include an artistic director and distribute leadership responsibility within a triad.

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